The Great Gatsby and Art Deco Design

So I have been seeing adverts and articles about The Great Gatsby all over the place lately!  Which got me thinking about what the era was all about in terms of Interior Design.  As well, it also got me thinking about Leonardo DiCaprio…one of my favourite actors!  Noooo………. this post is not just a reason to post a photo of the gorgeous and talented DiCaprio….I really am interested in learning a bit more about the Art Deco period…but one picture doesn’t hurt, does it?

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Cheers to that! (original source http://www.theweek.com)

Art Deco is thought to have originated in 1925 after an exhibition in Paris called the “Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes“.  Yet, the actual phrase “art deco” was not coined until the 1960’s when interest in this style re-emerged.   The 1925 show took place in Paris, still known today as one of the most fashionable cities in the world. The exhibits showed new styles that were modern and “nouveau”.  It was post World War 1 and wartime austerity was replaced by an economic boom and the world was moving into a new modern age.

Art Deco is recognised by it’s geometric designs and metallic colours. Materials that were used included industrial looking materials such as stainless steel, mirrors, chrome and glass.  This produced a sleek and glamorous look.

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Art Deco mirror (original source http://www.housetohome.co.uk)

Another very interesting influence was the discovery of King Tut’s tomb in 1922.   This brought about a world-wide interest in all things Egyptian.  This led to the Egyptian Ziggurat (Definition: A tower in the form of a terraced pyramid. http://www.freedictionary.com) style to be used in many art deco buildings and designs.  One of the most famous buildings made in this style has to be the Chrysler Building in New York City.

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Iconic building (original source http://www.thecityreview.com)

Travel to exotic locations brought about the use of exotic animal motifs and nature inspired themes.  Both which play heavily into Art Deco interior design.

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The geometric styling of this occasional table with the addition of the zebra print bench and mirror frame makes for a great Art Deco example. (original source http://www.bathroomsandmorestore.co.uk)

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Sunburst design. (original source http://www.art-deco-style.com)

And in America, Art Deco and Hollywood glamour went hand in hand.  The decadent and glitzy world on screen translated into real life as Hollywood productions took off!  Many associate the Roaring 20’s and Hollywood with the Art Deco style….which brings me back to the Great Gatsby and why I started this post in the first place……..and Leonardo DiCaprio………

leonardo

I couldn’t resist!

The influences and history of art deco go much deeper and far beyond what I can write about in this post but if you want to put a touch of Art Deco into your home, think:

Geometric shapes

Linear symmetries

Metallic accents

Monochromatic schemes

Nature inspired motifs

Exotic themes

Mirror and chrome surfaces

Hollywood glamour

Sculptural seating

just to name a few……..

I have a feeling with the release of The Great Gatsby that the Art Deco influences will be showing up more and more…both in fashion and in our homes.

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4 thoughts on “The Great Gatsby and Art Deco Design

    • That depends……on what look you want, how much wall space you have etc. I personally kept our original fireplaces in the 2 downstairs reception rooms but got rid of them in the bedrooms. I love original features but the bedroom ones didn’t work and took up valuable space (especially in the smaller rooms).

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